Monday, February 24, 2020

Risk2 Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 2500 words

Risk2 - Essay Example These regulations cut across the need for adequate liquidity and capital. â€Å"Liquidity is the ability to make payments as the fall due† (Moir, 1999). This implies that liquidity refers to access to money or liquid resources that can be easily transformed into cash in a short time. This is what enables a business to pay for its cost of operations and trading activities. The lack of liquidity will cause a business to fold up. Liquidity is mainly borne out of cash inflows and short term convertibles to cash. These resources are used to fund working capital. A bank, like any other business needs to hold enough liquid resources to fund its operations and existence. It needs to pay its workers, pay for the premises they use for operations as well as working tools like computers, cars and other day-to-day expenses. Without this, a bank will obviously fold up. Due to the nature of banking, there is the need for banks to look beyond working capital for the maintenance of operations. They need to hold enough liquid resources to meet the cash demands of their clients within short notices. This therefore means that a bank needs to have enough cash in its vaults or within reach so that when entities banking with them call for their monies, they will be able to honour their legal obligation to pay customers as and when they come to make demands. This puts the need to hold sufficient cash or cash resources for the payment of clients an inherent part of the working capital structure of commercial banks. However, banks also have the duty of increasing the wealth of people saving with them. A rational person who holds money will want it to increase in value by earning some interest or profits through savings or investments. In the capitalist setting where people have the right to choose when and how to invest their money, banks have an obligation to come up with competitive interests for people who decide to save with them. Higher interest rates offered by commercial b anks enables them to get more customers. This means that the commercial banks have the duty to invest the money of people who save with them in ventures that bring sufficient returns that enables them to pay high interests to their customers. Commercial banks therefore need to hold assets that can be used to re-generate revenue and sold for profits to attain the aim of providing high interest for their customers (Matz & Neu, 2007). As these assets generate revenues for the bank, the bank increases the wealth of the clients and earn more money through the sale of the assets. Thus, capitalisation is an important part of retail banking. Though the need to capitalise money deposited by clients is vital, clients also come in from time to time and demand their money. Due to the legal obligation of banks to make funds of their customers available to them when they need it, there is a strong need for banks to draw a balance between liquidity and capitalisation. A bank therefore needs to be careful to ensure that it has a fair balance between the two extremes. Investing too much money will mean shortage of money to pay customers who demand money. Also, failure to invest an adequate amount of money will mean that the bank will rake in lower

Friday, February 7, 2020

Journal Assignment Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 250 words - 55

Journal - Assignment Example I also dream of the future with no environmental pollution. I am aware of the dangers caused by environmental pollution, which encourage me to work hard unceasingly towards the achievement of that future. I believe that change begins with me. Therefore, I employ numerous management principles by ensuring that I conserve the available resources to preserve for future generations. This includes using energy, water, and land only to the capacity that can sustain me. I try as to use any alternative that is pollution-free or less-polluting. I have learned that through management of the natural environment, I have become a responsible individual all my life. I also believe in group work in management. This has led me to influence many other people in environmental issues. I lead by example to ensure that the current generation and the generation behind me adopt the same style of leadership. A good manager is also required to sharpen skills and competencies continually (Plunkett 12). I have done this by participating in seminars and other training sessions touching on the environment as well as reading articles on environmental

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Femile De Antonio And Michael Moore Essay Example for Free

Femile De Antonio And Michael Moore Essay Emile de Antonio and Michael Moore are American film makers whose work touches mainly on violence in various circles of life in America. Their film making is mainly on documentary basis and they give a brief summary of issues because they have a desire to communicate information that is to result into a positive change. One similarity in their work is the setting which is America. Their works are based on issues in America although the subjects that they address are slightly different. Michael Moore mainly targets the issues in the academic institutions. In his movie, bowling for the combine, he addresses violence in the combine high school. He presents cases of damage to human life through the use of guns. This is where students engage in violence by shooting their colleges whom they place as enemies. Moore has an intension of having discipline return in American learning institutions. Emile de Antonio on the other hand has one main aim of addressing the violence in American political arena. He addresses issues such of wars and violent assassinations. His works are also a documentary. In his movie, a white house comedy, Emile, who has affiliations with the Marxists talks about a young man’s drive towards 68’ general election. In the year of the pig, he addresses the policy that resulted into Vietnam War. His cases are mainly on politically motivated violence and he has an aim of creating peace and accountability in the American administration. His critism on political culture is fruitful although he was treading on dangerous grounds because he was against the government.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

Africans in Colonial Mexico Essay -- Research Papers Anthropology

Africans in Colonial Mexico The history of Africans in Mexico is an oft-neglected facet of the cultural complexities of that country. In 1519, Hernando Cortes brought 6 African slaves with him to Mexico; these individuals served the conquest as personal servants, carriers, and laborers.[1] In the years to come, slavery would become a critical component of the colonial economy with approximately 2,000 slaves arriving each year 1580-1650; it is estimated that a total of 200,000 Africans were brought to Mexico during the colonial period.[2] Given this large number of slaves, the lengthy period of their importation, and the inevitable mixing of races, which took place throughout the colony, the historical and cultural significance of bozales, criollos, mulattoes, and zambos is far-reaching. The colonial period provides an excellent starting place for an examination of the significance of these groups not only because the institution of African slavery was introduced to New Spain at that time, but also because t he regular influx of native Africans combined with the close attention paid to color-based castas in official records allows historians to trace the influence of African culture more readily during that period. The early years of colonial Mexico were a time of great change, as the native Indian populations were decimated by disease and increasingly dominated by the Spanish social and economic structure. Under the encomienda system, the initial flood of Spanish immigrants were provided with a support structure in New Spain, as the Indians’ land and labor were put at their disposal in exchange for moral guidance.[3] As Spain sought to reap the benefits of its new colony, the need for dependable labor in Mexico’s agr... ...Andrew L. â€Å"Yellow Fever and the Late Colonial Public Health Response in the Port of Veracruz.† Hispanic American Historical Review 77, no. 4 (1997): 619-644. 6. Love, Edgar F. â€Å"Negro Resistance to Spanish Rule in Colonial Mexico.† The Journal of Negro History 52, no. 2 (1967): 89-103. 7. MacLachlan, Colin M. and Jamie E. Rodriguez O. The Forging of the Cosmic Race: A Reinterpretation of Colonial Mexico. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980. 8. Meyer, Michael C., et al. The Course of Mexican History, 7th ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003. 9. Palmer, Colin A. Slaves of the White God: Blacks in Mexico, 1570-1650. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1976. 10. Richmond, Douglas. â€Å"The Legacy of African Slavery in Colonial Mexico, 1519-1810.† Journal of Popular Culture 35, no. 2 (2001): 1-17. Africans in Colonial Mexico Essay -- Research Papers Anthropology Africans in Colonial Mexico The history of Africans in Mexico is an oft-neglected facet of the cultural complexities of that country. In 1519, Hernando Cortes brought 6 African slaves with him to Mexico; these individuals served the conquest as personal servants, carriers, and laborers.[1] In the years to come, slavery would become a critical component of the colonial economy with approximately 2,000 slaves arriving each year 1580-1650; it is estimated that a total of 200,000 Africans were brought to Mexico during the colonial period.[2] Given this large number of slaves, the lengthy period of their importation, and the inevitable mixing of races, which took place throughout the colony, the historical and cultural significance of bozales, criollos, mulattoes, and zambos is far-reaching. The colonial period provides an excellent starting place for an examination of the significance of these groups not only because the institution of African slavery was introduced to New Spain at that time, but also because t he regular influx of native Africans combined with the close attention paid to color-based castas in official records allows historians to trace the influence of African culture more readily during that period. The early years of colonial Mexico were a time of great change, as the native Indian populations were decimated by disease and increasingly dominated by the Spanish social and economic structure. Under the encomienda system, the initial flood of Spanish immigrants were provided with a support structure in New Spain, as the Indians’ land and labor were put at their disposal in exchange for moral guidance.[3] As Spain sought to reap the benefits of its new colony, the need for dependable labor in Mexico’s agr... ...Andrew L. â€Å"Yellow Fever and the Late Colonial Public Health Response in the Port of Veracruz.† Hispanic American Historical Review 77, no. 4 (1997): 619-644. 6. Love, Edgar F. â€Å"Negro Resistance to Spanish Rule in Colonial Mexico.† The Journal of Negro History 52, no. 2 (1967): 89-103. 7. MacLachlan, Colin M. and Jamie E. Rodriguez O. The Forging of the Cosmic Race: A Reinterpretation of Colonial Mexico. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1980. 8. Meyer, Michael C., et al. The Course of Mexican History, 7th ed. New York: Oxford University Press, 2003. 9. Palmer, Colin A. Slaves of the White God: Blacks in Mexico, 1570-1650. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1976. 10. Richmond, Douglas. â€Å"The Legacy of African Slavery in Colonial Mexico, 1519-1810.† Journal of Popular Culture 35, no. 2 (2001): 1-17.

Monday, January 13, 2020

Ethical Analysis of Baby Theresa Essay

Baby Theresa is a very unique case. Theresa Ann Campo Pearson was an infant born in Florida 1992, with Anencephaly, which is where the two most important parts of the brain are missing, the cerebrum and cerebellum, as well as the top of the skull. Without these parts of the brain she would never have had higher brain functions or consciousness. However, there is still a brain stem connected so all the autonomic functions are still working, such as having a heart beat and breathing. Anencephaly is known as one of the worst congenital disorders, thus these cases are usually detected during pregnancy and aborted. If not aborted, half are stillborn or if born alive, they usually die within a few days. In Baby Theresa’s case, she died nine days after birth. Even though, knowing that Baby Theresa would not live long and never have a conscious life, her parents requested that her organs would not go to waste, but instead be donated for transplants for other infants in need before Theresa’s natural death. In fact, even physicians agreed that was a good idea because over 2000 infants need transplants each year. Unfortunately, the state of Florida prohibits euthanasia and that the organs only be removed when natural death occurs. Eventually, within the nine days Baby Theresa organs decayed and were not used because the Circuit Court Judge Estella Moriarty ruled that a Florida statute does not allow a person to be declared dead while any part of the brain is functioning. The judge told the parents: â€Å"I can’t authorize someone to take your baby’s life, however short, however unsatisfying, to save another child. † Which brings me to my first ethical argument, â€Å"It’s wrong to kill†. According to Immanuel Kant and his Kantian deontological theory, the principle of morality and our perfect duties, which one happens to be â€Å"it’s wrong to kill an innocent person†, comes from the categorical imperative. Kant states in the text on page 18 that, â€Å"act in such a way that you always treat humanity, whether in your own person or in the person of any other, never simply as a means, but always at the same time as an end. † This is basically saying you always respect another person’s dignity. Thus, from a  Kantian standpoint, it is wrong to kill Theresa and take her organs to save others because then they would be using her merely as a means to other infants’ ends. However, to play devils advocate, â€Å"using a person† typically means you are violating their autonomy- their right to live and decide for themselves according to their own desires and values. With that being said, Baby Theresa was not autonomous because she had no consciousness, she had no ability to ever decide what was in her best interest and desire. So, technically, the Judge of the circuit court was not respecting the parents’ dignity of wanting to donate Theresa’s organs. For that reason, D. W Ross’s theory should have been taken into consideration. Indeed, I understand why the judge decided to make the ruling she did because if she did allow the physicians to take Theresa’s life before natural death took its course, it would have possibly undermined all physicians as untrustworthy, which could have ruined the patient-physician relationship. However, even though her ruling was very understandable, an important and very valuable theory should not have been over looked with a case as exceptional as this one, the Prima Facie Duty. W. D Ross explains when to consider this theory on page 23 that, â€Å" to provide a defensible account of â€Å"cases of conscience,† that is, situations that confront us with a conflict of duties. † Meaning when a person is uncertain and unsettled, but still must make a decision, but yet does not know which direction to go, you make a Prima Facie Duty. Ross then went on to explain that, â€Å"a Prima Facie Duty can be overridden by another Prima Facie Duty that in a particular set of circumstances is more stringent. With that being said, the duty of justice and the duty of beneficence can both be applied here because the Judge should have respected the parents’ religion and wishes, in their time of distress, to make their own personal decisions with their daughter by making other beings in the world conditions better. Also, the â€Å"it’s wrong to kill an innocent person† argument can be debated as well. Yes, I agree, it is wrong to kill a person to save another person, but there are exceptions, like what even makes a person, a person? Should Baby Theresa be considered a person? Research shows that all people have minds and all minds are capable of conscious mental activity, which Baby Theresa did not any thoughts or feelings, she was basically just breathing, so she should not have been considered as a person by these terms. Indeed, many infants could have benefitted from Baby Theresa’s organs, leading me to believe that the Utilitarianism theory was the correct approach to take for this case. In fact, when Jeremy Bentham created the Utilitarianism theory, he also made a point to focus on the consequences as much as the positive outcomes, which was called the Hedonistic Calculus. The Hedonistic Calculus is like a compare and contrast graph to weigh out the pleasures and pains of a situation because his main principle was, â€Å"act to promote the greatest amount of happiness for the greatest amount of people and less suffering to the less amount of people† and pleasure is the only value in the world based on the hedonism. With this in mind, if the parents were happy with making other families happy by giving their child organs for a good cause without technically harming or killing Baby Theresa, they ought to do so and that is what Ethics is all about, what you ought to do in a dilemma. Where as, on the other hand, by not allowing the organs to be donated for transplants, not only was the Judge dissatisfying Theresa parents wishes, she was possibly causing a larger chain reaction of disappointment and agony to the other families who would have been grateful and appreciative of Theresa organs, rather than allowing them to decay, causing pain to multiple parties. Ultimately, this case is a tricky one because I fully understand both the Kantian Theory plus the Utilitarianism and Consequentialist theory, but I see absolutely no benefits from overriding the parents’ beliefs and wishes of wanting to donate Theresa’s kidneys, liver, heart, lungs, and eyes because overall, many children could have tremendously benefitted from them.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

Compare the ways in which Kate Chopin and James Joyce...

Compare the ways in which Kate Chopin and James Joyce portray Dorothea and Eveline Compare the ways in which Kate Chopin and James Joyce portray Dorothea and Eveline, and their relationship to men, in the stories ‘the unexpected’ and ‘Eveline’. James Joyce and Kate Chopin, both wrote at the turn of the nineteenth century; were women’s rights were very different to today. James Joyce is actually a feminist writer, however due to the outlook on women it was not seen to be respectable. Therefore she used the pseudonym (James). However Kate did not do this because she wanted to make the stand and try to make people see that women are relevant to life. The general status of women on the turn of the century was very dull. Women†¦show more content†¦Eveline, in contrast was a working class women. However even though she had a job in the store, the men with the same type of job as her tried to show that they were superior, by teasing and taunting her. Unlike Dorothea, she had a very dominant farther who was often was violent towards her. Then the same thing happened to her as Dorothea, a new fresh beginning could be hers for the taking, a time for marriage. The man that wanted to give her all of this was named Frank; he was a sailor and wanted to give her a sort of ‘bohemian’ life style. However like before she decides to stay with her farther, who didn’t give her a good life. Whilst both women were given the opportunity to ‘escape’ there daily bad lives; they both deal with their opportunities in very different ways and very different reasons. The situation at the start of the stories that both women are in is one of anxiety, this is because both appear to be controlled by their parents. However they both have what seems to be an unbreakable love on their men (Randall and Frank). Dorothea found a man that appeared to love and be devoted to her, and her to him: The good-by dragged with lingering kisses and sighs, and more kisses and more clinging till the last wrench came. This quotation shows the deep love that they both have for each other; it shows this because it explains their position is like they are almost linked in a way that they are inseparable. However when we look

Friday, December 27, 2019

Compar and Contrast - 997 Words

University of Phoenix Material Compare and Contrast Absolutism and Constitutionalism Matrix By the close of the 17th century, England had developed into a Constitutional Monarchy and France had developed into an Absolutist, centralized form of monarchy. Complete the matrix below to examine why this happened. |Deciding Factors |England Constitutional |France Absolutist | | |Monarchy |Monarchy | |Revenue concerns |What did England do to increase revenue? |What did France do to increase†¦show more content†¦|had to be passed to someone else. Being |government. He also depended upon strength | | |that Queen Elizabeth was never married, |with the royal power; the Huguenots shared | | |therefore had no children, the throne had |the state, theShow MoreRelatedGlobal Business Cultural Analysis Of Japan Essay1627 Words   |  7 Pageshardships/special business considerations between Japan/U.S./other nations 4.1 Distinct differences between business in Japan and U.S. 4.1.1 Challenges/barriers in Japan’s domestic business 4.1.2 Challenges/barries in the U.S.’s domestic business 4.1.3 Compar and contrast challenges and barriers between Japan and U.S. 4.2 Deal breakers 4.2.1 What breaks a deal in Japan? 4.2.2 What breaks a deal in the U.S.? 4.2.3 Analysis of the two and the differences between broken deals. 4.3 A way ahead 4.3.1 Summary/TransitionRead MoreEssay on the Moral Development of Children, Through the Ages and Stages; Referring to Kohlberg and Lickona.2197 Words   |  9 Pageschildhood. Erickson, another social theorist, modified Freudian theory by extending the idea that moral development continued into adulthood (Berk, 1994). The superego was viewed more positively with behavior motivated by ideals versus sanctions. In contrast, Banduras social learning theory (1991) outlines moral development as a consequence of modeling, where children observe and imitate the moral behavior of the adults in their world. The models characteristics are important as children tend to imitateRead MoreAustralians Belief in Equal Employment Opportunity2601 Words   |  10 Pagessimple at a point in life. Secondly, the two concepts diverge on the degree of government intercession needed. On the narrow FEOP viewpoint, governments are simply anticipated to modestly interfere to prevent obvious or concealed discrimination. By contrast, under SEOP, governments would be anticipated to aggressively interfere to make sure that: As children, citizens are not unjustifiably hindered by lack of family wealth, status and power from acquiring their full potential for education; and AsRead MoreThe Production of a Manga Culture in France: a Sociological Analysis of a Successful Intercultural Reception4707 Words   |  19 Pagesconflicts between traditional cultural â€Å"gatekeepers† and fans, which led to different forms of cultural acknowledgement of manga and anime. 1 - See Rafoni Bà ©atrice,  « Le nà ©o-japonisme en France : de l’influence de la culture mà ©diatique japonaise  », Compar(a)ison, 2, 2002 2 I refer here to the sociological concept of â€Å"cultural capital† elaborated by Pierre Bourdieu in La Reproduction, Minuit (1970) and La distinction, Minuit (1979). It describes forms of knowledge and skills providing prestige and aRead MoreMethods of Lexicological Analysis5014 Words   |  21 PagesINTRODUCTION Growing interest in methods of study is one of the most symptomatic features of present-day linguistics. The research methods used in lexicology have always been closely connected with the general trends in linguistics. The principles of compar ¬ative linguistics have played an important role in the development of a scientific approach to historical word study. They have brought an enor ¬mous increase in ordered and classified information about the English vocabulary in their proper perspectiveRead MoreComparative Public Administration11510 Words   |  47 Pagescomparisons of administfativesystems has had a long traditibn. But a focus on this aspect of administrative studies is about forty years old. Only ttfter the Second World War and with the emergence of new nations in Asia and Africa, a vigorous interest in compar*ve studies of Public Administration has evolved. Comparative Public Administration, in simple terms, refers to a comparative study of government administrative systems functioning in differentcountries o the world. The nature of E Comparative AdministrationRead More Hydraulic System Introduction18784 Words   |  76 PagesSelf-lubricating. (4) Infinitely variable speeds. (5) No static electricity. (6) Linear motion. (7) Low speed, high torque with motors. However, there is a downside! Disadvantages: (1) Large pipework is often employed (in contrast to the relatively thin wiring used in electrical systems). (2) Units are often physically larger. (3) Large diversity of units available which can sometimes mean that spares are difficult to obtain. (4) Hydraulic units, particularly